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I am a sex addict

Welcome to a place of trust!

Get the facts. Get Help! Contact us now in Australia by email at help at pinkcross.org.au for a confidential discussion.

You are exactly where you were supposed to be. There is no looking back; we will bring you hope in your struggle with porn addiction. You are not alone.

At Pink Cross Foundation Australia we have a team of men (and women) who will meet up with you either in person or over the phone and address your issue without judgement. We can also refer you to different organisations who can also bring you a new understanding of what happened to you and how you can start living a normal life again. Using pornography is very common as it is so widespread in our society. We believe people can lead porn-free lives. We believe people can learn again how to love, nurture and have a healthy sexual life without needing pornography.

Do you believe sexual favors are owed to you? Read this.

 

The average age for young people to come across pornography is 11 years old (for boys).

80% of people aged between 8 and 16 years old have come accross pornography while doing homework on the computer.

17% of women are struggling with porn addiction.

(Source: Retrieved on 3 August 2014 from familysafemedia.com/pornography_statistics.html)

 

If you found this information useful, please consider donating here for our research. We are unfunded and all volunteer-based.

If you have resources on your website as a group or organisation and would like to be listed here, please email us the details: info at pinkcross.org.au

We cannot guarantee your site will be featured and may take a couple of weeks to add it to this list due to the voluntary nature of our activities.

 

 

Symptoms of Sexual Addiction  By Michael Herkov, Ph.D

In 2010, the American Psychiatric Association issued its preliminary criteria for “Hypersexual Disorder,” which may be a possible alternative definition or diagnostic label for sex addiction.

  • Frequently engaging in more sex and with more partners than intended.
  • Being preoccupied with or persistently craving sex; wanting to cut down and unsuccessfully attempting to limit sexual activity.
  • Thinking of sex to the detriment of other activities or continually engaging in excessive sexual practices despite a desire to stop.
  • Spending considerable time in activities related to sex, such as cruising for partners or spending hours online visiting pornographic Web sites.
  • Neglecting obligations such as work, school or family in pursuit of sex.
  • Continually engaging in the sexual behavior despite negative consequences, such as broken relationships or potential health risks.
  • Escalating scope or frequency of sexual activity to achieve the desired effect, such as more frequent visits to prostitutes or more sex partners.
  • Feeling irritable when unable to engage in the desired behavior.

You may have a sex addiction problem if you identify with three or more of the above criteria. More generally, sex addicts tend to organize their world around sex in the same way that cocaine addicts organize theirs around cocaine. Their goal in interacting with people and in social situations is obtaining sexual pleasure.

While there is no official diagnosis for sex addiction, clinicians and researchers have attempted to define the disorder using criteria based on chemical dependency literature.


Symptoms of Hypersexual Disorder (Sex Addiction) By John M. Grohol, Psy.D.

In 2010, the American Psychiatric Association released draft, preliminary criteria that may define “sex addiction,” which they are formally called Hypersexual Disorder. Hypersexual disorder can only be diagnosed in adults 18 years or older, according to the draft criteria.

The symptoms of Hypersexual Disorder are:

  • Over a period of at least six months, a person experiences recurrent and intense sexual fantasies, sexual urges, and sexual behavior in association with four or more of the following five criteria:
  1. Excessive time is consumed by sexual fantasies and urges, and by planning for and engaging in sexual behavior.
  2. Repetitively engaging in these sexual fantasies, urges, and behavior in response to dysphoric mood states (e.g., anxiety, depression, boredom, irritability).
  3. Repetitively engaging in sexual fantasies, urges, and behavior in response to stressful life events.
  4. Repetitive but unsuccessful efforts to control or significantly reduce these sexual fantasies, urges, and behavior.
  5. Repetitively engaging in sexual behavior while disregarding the risk for physical or emotional harm to self or others.

These sexual fantasies, urges, and behavior are not due to direct physiological effects of drugs or medications, or to Manic Episodes.

(Source: Retrieved from PsychCentral on 3 August 2014. http://psychcentral.com/lib/symptoms-of-sexual-addiction/000745)

 

Get the facts. Get Help! Contact us now in Australia by email at help at pinkcross.org.au for a confidential discussion.

 

If you found this information useful, please consider donating here for our research. We are unfunded and all volunteer-based.

 If you have resources on your website as a group or organisation and would like to be listed here, please email us the details: info at pinkcross.org.au

 We cannot guarantee your site will be featured and may take a couple of weeks to add it to this list due to the voluntary nature of our activities.

 

Sex addiction criteria finalized
By Janice Wood Associate News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on October 21, 2012


A team of researchers from the University of California-Los Angeles have tested proposed criteria for diagnosing “hypersexual disorder” — more commonly called sexual addiction — as a new mental health condition. The researchers found the new criteria to do a good job in discriminating between those who have sex addiction and those who don’t.


While sexual addiction is often fodder for talk shows and comedians, researchers say it is no laughing matter as relationships are destroyed, jobs are lost, and lives are ruined. Even with these dire consequences, psychiatrists have been reluctant to accept the idea of out-of-control sexual behavior as a mental health disorder because of the lack of scientific evidence, the researchers said.


Rory Reid, Ph.D., a research psychologist and assistant professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute of Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, led a team of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and marriage and family therapists who found the proposed criteria to be reliable and valid in helping mental health professionals accurately diagnose hypersexual disorder. The results of the study, reported in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, will be a factor in whether hypersexual disorder should be included in the forthcoming revised fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the primary diagnostic reference book for psychiatry, the researchers noted.


“The criteria for hypersexual disorder that have been proposed, and now tested, will allow researchers and clinicians to study, treat and develop prevention strategies for individuals at risk for developing hypersexual behavior,” he said. The criteria, developed by a DSM-5 sexual and gender identity disorders work group for the revised manual, establish a number of symptoms that must be present in order for the diagnosis to be made.


The symptoms for sex addiction include a recurring pattern of sexual fantasies, urges and behaviors lasting six months or longer that are not caused by other issues, such as substance abuse, another medical condition or manic episodes associated with bipolar disorder. Also, an individual must show a pattern of sexual activity in response to unpleasant mood states, such as feeling depressed, or a pattern of repeatedly using sex as a way of coping with stress.The criteria also states that individuals must be unsuccessful in their attempts to reduce or stop sexual activities they believe are problematic. “As with many other mental health disorders, there must also be evidence of personal distress caused by the sexual behaviors that interfere with relationships, work or other important aspects of life,” Reid said.


To test the criteria, Reid and his colleagues conducted psychological testing and interviews with 207 patients in several mental health clinics around the country. All of the patients were seeking help for out-of-control sexual behavior, a substance-abuse disorder or another psychiatric condition, such as depression or anxiety. The researchers found that the proposed criteria for hypersexual disorder accurately classified 88 percent of hypersexual patients as having the disorder. The criteria were also accurate in identifying negative results 93 percent of the time.


In other words, the criteria appear to do a good job of discriminating between patients who experience hypersexual behavior and those who don’t, such as patients seeking help for other mental health conditions like anxiety, depression or substance abuse.
“The results lead us to believe that the proposed criteria tend not to identify patients who don’t have problems with their sexual behavior,” Reid said. “This is a significant finding, since many had expressed concerns that the proposal would falsely classify individuals.”


Another finding of the study was that patients who met the criteria for hypersexual disorder experienced significantly greater consequences for their sexual activities, compared with individuals with a substance-abuse diagnosis or a general medical condition, according to Reid. Of the 207 patients they examined, 17 percent had lost a job at least once, 39 percent had a relationship end, 28 percent contracted a sexually transmitted disease, and 78 percent had interference with healthy sex.
“Our study showed increased hypersexual behavior was related to greater emotional disturbance, impulsivity and an inability to manage stress,” he said.


Another interesting finding, according to Reid, was that 54 percent of the hypersexual patients felt their sexual behavior began to be a problem before the age of 18. Another 30 percent reported that it began to be problematic during their college-aged years, from 18 to 25. “This appears to be a disorder that emerges in adolescence and young adulthood, which has ramifications for early intervention and prevention strategies,” Reid said.

 

The study also examined the types of sexual behavior that hypersexual patients reported. The most common included masturbation and excessive use of pornography, followed by sex with another consenting adult and cybersex. The study noted that hypersexual patients had sex with commercial sex workers, had repeated affairs or multiple anonymous partners, amounting to an average of 15 sex partners in the previous 12-month period. “It’s not that a lot of people don’t take sexual risks from time to time or use sex on occasion to cope with stress or just escape, but for these patients, it’s a constant pattern that escalates until their desire for sex is controlling every aspect of their lives and they feel powerless in their efforts to change,” Reid noted.

(Source: Retrieved on 3 August 2014 from psychcentral.com/news/2012/10/21/sex-addiction-criteria-finalized/46411.html)

Get the facts. Get Help! Contact us now in Australia by email at help at pinkcross.org.au for a confidential discussion.

 

If you found this information useful, please consider donating here for our research. We are unfunded and all volunteer-based.

 If you have resources on your website as a group or organisation and would like to be listed here, please email us the details: info at pinkcross.org.au 

 We cannot guarantee your site will be featured and may take a couple of weeks to add it to this list due to the voluntary nature of our activities.

Do you believe sexual favors are owed to you? Read this.